BeBop Breakdown

Surprise! Something for bike geeks for a change…

About two years ago, I switched clip-less pedal systems from Shimano SPDs to VPone BeBops. I did this based on the extra “float” or amount of free twisting the shoe has on the pedal before encountering resistance or releasing the shoe from the pedal. The BeBops have about 20 degrees of float as compared to the 5 degrees of float offered by the SPDs. I occasionally suffer from knee pain and more float was supposed to help. I was also in need of new shoes at the time so I decided to switch.
Shoes and tools
The BeBop pedals did indeed help with the knee pain, are very comfortable, move smoothly when engaged and clip in and out easily. But they have not been as durable as I would like. I’ve broken two right pedals, possibly due to insufficiently clearing the plastic away from the crank side of the shoe near the cleat (see the picture below). And over the past few rides, the left cleat has started to come loose from the pedal without my turning it to release it. I noticed this on the Leitra and thought it might have been due to wear on the pedal given my earlier failures, but today I rode my V-Rex and had the same thing happen. Time to swap in new cleats. One of the old cleats is shown below on the top of the picture and a new cleat on the bottom.
Shoes with cleats
I had extra cleats from the pedal failures and expected this to be a 10 minute repair, but unfortunately, the two hole plate in the shoe that one screws the cleat into broke on my right shoe (see the pictures below). So I had to take the shoe apart and replace the plate turning this into a 45 minute repair. Ugh. At least I have two shiny new cleats now and I’m all set for the ride to work tomorrow.
Cleat and broken plate
Shoe plate